Monday, 5 November 2012

Garden flowers 2012

With a wet and dull November begun, it is time to look back at the delights of a summer garden and then to look forward to next year. What a year it has been, the Spring was hot and dry and the chief concern was planning for a long drought. The summer was a wash-out with only a few days where it was practical to enjoy the garden. The wonky seasons were reflected in the performance of the plants, many did not get the sun and heat they needed, others coped admirably. Back in May all seemed OK, the cotoneaster horizontalis was full of bloom and bees.

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Hostas like it moist so they did well.

garden,hosta

And onions.

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The mature shrubs that reliably flower in May such as weigelas.

garden,weigela

garden,weigela

And as ever the Chinese beauty Bush (Kolkwitzia).

garden,Kolkwitzia

Now the annuals, they were powered on by the hot spell in March/April and then suffered with all the cool and damp. They put on a fair show. Nigella was one of the early ones.

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I bought a new variety of Cosmos whose flowers change colour with age from red to pink. Quite pretty, however the plants themselves were too straggly.

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One real stunner from seed were Lavatera, it was covered in pure white flowers, but they were all over too soon.

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One real winner this year was Crocosmia. Best year ever - I have it in a dry spot and the extra moisture made all the difference.

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I have grown Echinacea from seed a few years ago and they are now putting up an excellent show each year.

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Another perennial that I had nurtured from seed last year that almost got the chop was Evening Primrose (Oenothera) because it did not flower. I was very glad I kept the faith as this year it flowered all summer long.

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My biggest disappointment was a climber that usually makes incredible growth and flowers for a long time. This year Mina Lobata really struggled in the cool, damp conditions.

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Finally a plant that prospered even though I thought it a warm climate plant - a nasturtium that has seeded itself around quite nicely.

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